RECENT NEWS

To Members of the Portland Community: As organizations committed to ensuring all Mainers have access to safe, affordable housing, we are writing today to raise our concerns with Portland Question C, which will appear on the city’s ballot this election. Portland Question C is called a “Green New Deal” by its proponents, but the proposal, which is more than 15 pages long, also includes provisions unrelated to energy efficiency, the production of renewable energy or sustainability. Question C would have severe, negative repercussions for efforts to increase the availability of affordable housing in Portland.

Builders of Affordable Housing Unanimously Reject Question C

To Members of the Portland Community: As organizations committed to ensuring all Mainers have access to safe, affordable housing, we are writing today to raise our concerns with Portland Question C, which will appear on the city’s ballot this election. Portland Question C is called a “Green New Deal” by its proponents, but the proposal, which is more than 15 pages long, also includes provisions unrelated to energy efficiency, the production of renewable energy or sustainability. Question C would have severe, negative repercussions for efforts to increase the availability of affordable housing in Portland.

A political action committee formed to oppose three referendum questions on Portland ballot said the proposals are a “cluster bomb of ideas” that threaten all forms of housing production in the city, including much needed affordable housing.

Building a Better Portland launched its campaign Friday against three of the six referendum questions on the city’s Nov. 3 ballot. The group opposes Question C: An Act to Implement a Green New Deal for Portland, Question D: An Act to Protect Tenants and Question E: An Act to Restrict Short Term Rentals in Portland.

Group launches campaign against 3 ballot questions in Portland

A political action committee formed to oppose three referendum questions on Portland ballot said the proposals are a “cluster bomb of ideas” that threaten all forms of housing production in the city, including much needed affordable housing.

Building a Better Portland launched its campaign Friday against three of the six referendum questions on the city’s Nov. 3 ballot. The group opposes Question C: An Act to Implement a Green New Deal for Portland, Question D: An Act to Protect Tenants and Question E: An Act to Restrict Short Term Rentals in Portland.

As housing in Portland gets more expensive, a small group of advocates is pushing for rent control. It fact, it's on the ballot for you to decide. Those against it say the proposal is reckless and would actually make it harder to find affordable housing. Portland landlords and even some affordable housing advocates say this proposal would make the problem of rising rents even worse.

Developers, economists warn Portland rent control would lead to less affordable housing

As housing in Portland gets more expensive, a small group of advocates is pushing for rent control. It fact, it's on the ballot for you to decide. Those against it say the proposal is reckless and would actually make it harder to find affordable housing. Portland landlords and even some affordable housing advocates say this proposal would make the problem of rising rents even worse.

The Maine Affordable Housing Coalition says the local referendum measure would worsen the city's affordable housing crisis.

Affordable housing group opposes Portland’s ‘Green New Deal’

The Maine Affordable Housing Coalition says the local referendum measure would worsen the city's affordable housing crisis.

For the second time in three years, housing activists are asking voters in Maine’s largest city to enact a form of rent control. A similar proposal was rejected by a nearly 2-1 margin in 2017.

Rent control proposal heads to Portland voters again

For the second time in three years, housing activists are asking voters in Maine’s largest city to enact a form of rent control. A similar proposal was rejected by a nearly 2-1 margin in 2017.

Though well intentioned, these referenda will not accomplish what they claim. They will, in fact, do the opposite: make it more difficult to develop affordable housing; lead to job losses and local business shutdowns, and make it harder for the city to enact its plans to combat climate change. Let’s take them one by one.

Councilor Ray: Portland ballot initiatives won’t accomplish what they claim

Though well intentioned, these referenda will not accomplish what they claim. They will, in fact, do the opposite: make it more difficult to develop affordable housing; lead to job losses and local business shutdowns, and make it harder for the city to enact its plans to combat climate change. Let’s take them one by one.

Portland Mayor Kate Snyder and seven city councilors announced Tuesday that they oppose all five citizen referendum proposals placed on the Nov. 3 ballot by the Southern Maine Democratic Socialists of America.

Portland mayor and most councilors announce opposition to 5 referendum questions

Portland Mayor Kate Snyder and seven city councilors announced Tuesday that they oppose all five citizen referendum proposals placed on the Nov. 3 ballot by the Southern Maine Democratic Socialists of America.

Portland voters are facing a slate of five questions that have been put forward by a new organization called People First Portland and would deeply affect everyone who lives, works, visits or does business in the city. If passed, they can’t be changed for five years without another referendum. All five questions include ideas that the city should consider. But none of them are “yes or no” questions. Since those are only two boxes on our ballot, our recommendation on questions A through E is to vote “no.”

Portland Press Herald Endorsement: Portland should vote ‘no’ on Questions A, B, C, D and E

Portland voters are facing a slate of five questions that have been put forward by a new organization called People First Portland and would deeply affect everyone who lives, works, visits or does business in the city. If passed, they can’t be changed for five years without another referendum. All five questions include ideas that the city should consider. But none of them are “yes or no” questions. Since those are only two boxes on our ballot, our recommendation on questions A through E is to vote “no.”

As cities become ever-more expensive, politicians and housing advocates keep calling for rent control. Economists think that’s a terrible idea. They say it helps a small (albeit noisy) group of renters, but keeps overall rents artificially high by disincentivizing new construction. So what happens next?

Why Rent Control Doesn’t Work, Podcast by Freakonomics

As cities become ever-more expensive, politicians and housing advocates keep calling for rent control. Economists think that’s a terrible idea. They say it helps a small (albeit noisy) group of renters, but keeps overall rents artificially high by disincentivizing new construction. So what happens next?

New research examining how rent control affects tenants and housing markets offers insight into how rent control affects markets. While rent control appears to help current tenants in the short run, in the long run it decreases affordability, fuels gentrification, and creates negative spillovers on the surrounding neighborhood.

Report: What does economic evidence tell us about the effects of rent control?

New research examining how rent control affects tenants and housing markets offers insight into how rent control affects markets. While rent control appears to help current tenants in the short run, in the long run it decreases affordability, fuels gentrification, and creates negative spillovers on the surrounding neighborhood.